NASA Summer Internship

In partnership with NASA Centers, including Ames, Glenn, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Langley, MACES selects 6-10 students to participate in a 10-week NASA Summer Internship Program each year. Students are chosen through a merit-based selection process. Fellowships include a stipend of $6000 for undergraduates and $8000 for graduate students. Applications are accepted between January 5 and February 5 each year.

By working on a research project under the guidance of a designated NASA mentor, student interns will have the exciting opportunity to acquire important scientific skills and apply his/her training and talent to tackle technical challenges in aeronautics and space missions. Interns will also gain professional preparation and connections for future career opportunities at NASA. The internship program is a key pipeline of NASA’s workforce.

For more information, please visit OSSI

Students need to meet the following criteria(s):

  • US Citizen
  • Full-time UC Merced undergraduate and/or graduate student
  • GPA > 3.0

Interns' Testimonials:

"This internship has given me a deeper appreciation of the work put into developing and testing new materials for aerospace applications. The hands on experience taught me how to use various instruments, as well as materials development and processing tools. The exposure to the professional environment and networking opportunities were a great way to prepare for future success." - Undergraduate student James Rosenberg, from Jennifer Lu's lab (2016)

"I was able to get hands-on experience on a number of instruments: Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscope, and Scanning electron microscope throughout the summer. My ability to work independently and solve my own problems was challenged. From this I have learned how to conduct research more effectively. This internship has allowed me to experience the work environment in a nanomaterial research lab with highly respected and talented researchers." - Undergraduate student Denzel Martin, from Sai Ghosh's lab (2016)

"Working at NASA Ames has given me a deeper appreciation for the genealogy of scientific discovery. Although each discovery occurs because of new ideas, research as a whole builds upon the hard work of previous scientists. Every day, I am excited to go into the lab and contribute to our societal body of knowledge." - Graduate student A'Lester Allen, from Jin Zhang's lab (2016)

"Working this summer at NASA Ames Research Center with Dr. Jing Li has been the highlight of the year. The thing that NASA does better than any other organization on Earth is inspire people and make them believe in seemingly impossible goals can be accomplished. Working with such a great team on research that will make a difference is not only inspiring, but motivating. I'm looking forward to working with NASA as I incorporate my summer project into my PhD dissertation and hope to inspire future scientists the way NASA has inspired me." - Graduate student Zach Petrek, from Tao Ye's lab (2017)

"The internship experience at the NASA Glenn research center was both a professional and scientific learning experience. During my stay I learned how to interact and communicate with other individuals in a professional scientific work environment. I also learned vital technical and research skills which I will carry with me and build on for the rest of my future professional career. To be able to work for and make connections with such a well known and incredible scientific organization this summer was an honor." - Undergraduate Student Jesus Partida, from Ashlie Martini's lab (2017)

"At the NASA- Glenn Research Center, I learned how to design and characterize sulfur-carbon cathodes. I had a great time there. I was impressed by the wide range of analytical instruments. I was happy that I was able to fix and re-calibrate some of the instruments. " - Graduate Student Carlos Ortuno-Quintana, from Jennifer Lu's lab (2017)

"At the NASA Langley Research Center, I received incomparable mentoring on my project, training on sophisticated equipment, and most importantly discovered a passion for space exploration technology. Outside of the lab, I attended many seminars, professional development and networking workshops, and intern social events on center. My summer project was the most challenging and exciting topic I could have asked for: an experimental and theoretical analysis of the neutron shielding effectiveness of boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and BNNT composites. The motivation for the project was the need for protection against harmful space radiation during future missions to Mars and deep space. To think that my work could some day improve the safety of astronauts on their missions in outer space is mind-boggling and inspiring. Near the end of my program, I received an offer to extend my internship, which I gladly accepted. I am now continuing work under the same mentors, and resuming with the same project." - Undergraduate Student Victoria Arias, from Jennifer Lu's lab (2017)

Undergraduate student summer intern James Rosenberg and Denzel Martin with research scientists at NASA Langley.

Undergraduate student summer intern James Rosenberg and Denzel Martin with research scientists at NASA Langley.

Jesus with his mentor, Dr. DellaCorte, and NASA scientists at NASA Glenn during his presentation.

Jesus with his mentor, Dr. DellaCorte, and NASA scientists at NASA Glenn during his presentation.

Graduate student summer intern A’Lester Allen, working in Dr. Bin Chen’s lab at NASA Ames, is aligning a 532 nm green laser through a photonic crystal (PCF) fiber for measurement of peptides and proteins.

Graduate student summer intern A’Lester Allen, working in Dr. Bin Chen’s lab at NASA Ames, is aligning a 532 nm green laser through a photonic crystal (PCF) fiber for measurement of peptides and proteins.

James Rosenberg and Victoria Aries met , Hidden Figures - Margot Lee Shetterly, at the NASA-Langley Centennial celebration.

James Rosenberg and Victoria Aries met , Hidden Figures - Margot Lee Shetterly, at the NASA-Langley Centennial celebration.